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Libraries Celebrate Black History Month

Display to celebrate Black History Month
Fri, 01/31/2020

The Georgetown and Waccamaw Libraries are pulling out all the stops to explore the Lowcountry’s past and present during Black History Month. From displays to performances, there’s something for every age.

ONGOING

The Waccamaw Library will feature a special exhibit of West African artifacts, including carved statues, serving dishes, chess sets, and articles of clothing, throughout February 2020 as part of its celebration of Black History Month. Pawleys Island resident Mike Turner collected the items during his service in the Peace Corps (1967-1969) in a small village called Thieval Lao in Senegal in West Africa. The artifacts originate from Senegal as well as neighboring countries, including Ivory Coast, Ghana, Nigeria, and Mali.

The Georgetown Library has an exhibit of African American antique dolls collected over several decades. The display is also buttressed by a collection of children’s books celebrating Black History.

ONE TIME EVENTS

  • WACCAMAW LIBRARY: Thursday, February 6 at 10:00 a.m. “FOWL 1st Thursday: Small Place, Deep History: The Legacies of Sandy Island” by Vennie Deas Moore. A cultural historian with expertise in folk traditions of her native South Carolina Lowcountry, Vennie Deas Moore will explore the many-faceted histories of Sandy Island, the largest undeveloped freshwater island on the eastern coast. Many of the small Island community are descendants of enslaved Africans who worked on area rice plantations, and Islanders strive to maintain traditional Gullah culture against the blurring rush of modernity. Deas Moore will speak to the sustaining values of the Gullah community, including their interwoven ties to heritage, respect for craft, and stewardship of the land. Her presentation, rich with her own photographic images, will testify to why it is important that Sandy Island culture continues not only to survive, but thrive.
  • GEORGETOWN LIBRARY: The Friends of the Georgetown Library will also celebrate the month with a lecture by Zenobia Washington, a local artist and historian, called “Who Are the Gullah People?” The lecture is part of the Friends “Tuesdays With…” series and will be held on Tuesday, February 18 at 10 am in the Georgetown Library Auditorium. Zenobia will explore the unique culture created by African Americans who live in the Lowcountry region of Georgia, Florida, and South Carolina, with a special emphasis on our area.
  • WACCAMAW LIBRARY: Tuesday, February 18 at 6:00 p.m. “Toni Morrison: An American Visionary” by John Charles Williamson, Ph.D. On what would have been Toni Morrison’s 89th birthday, Dr. Williamson will discuss essential elements of Morrison’s craft by illuminating key passages from her works. He will guide audience members through in-depth interpretations of passages to share the richness and brilliance of Morrison’s technique and themes. Though he will come prepared with passages, he would like to encourage attendees to bring in their favorite passages from Morrison’s work to share with the group. Sharing moving passages with others seems a fitting way to honor the legacy of Morrison, who passed away in August 2019. Among her many other honors, Morrison was the first African American woman to win the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1993.
  • WACCAMAW LIBRARY: Tuesday, February 18 at 6:00 p.m. “Toni Morrison: An American Visionary” by John Charles Williamson, Ph.D. On what would have been Toni Morrison’s 89th birthday, Dr. Williamson will discuss essential elements of Morrison’s craft by illuminating key passages from her works. He will guide audience members through in-depth interpretations of passages to share the richness and brilliance of Morrison’s technique and themes. Though he will come prepared with passages, he would like to encourage attendees to bring in their favorite passages from Morrison’s work to share with the group. Sharing moving passages with others seems a fitting way to honor the legacy of Morrison, who passed away in August 2019. Among her many other honors, Morrison was the first African American woman to win the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1993.
  • WACCAMAW LIBRARY: Thursday, February 20 at 10:00 a.m. “Litchfield Tea & Poetry Series: Al Black & Gary Jackson.” Featured poets Al Black and Gary Jackson both draw attention to matters of racial inequity and struggle through their work. An Indiana native, Black has published two poetry collections, I Only Left For Tea (2014) and Man With Two Shadows (2018); co-edited Hand in Hand, Poets Respond to Race (2017); and is published in anthologies, journals, and periodicals. He hosts arts events, co-founded Poets Respond to Race Initiative and was Jasper Magazine’s 2017 Literary Artist of the Year. Gary Jackson is the author of the poetry collection Missing You, Metropolis, which received the 2009 Cave Canem Poetry Prize. His poems have appeared in Callaloo, Tin House, Los Angeles Review of Books, and elsewhere. He teaches in the MFA program at the College of Charleston in Charleston, South Carolina.
  • WACCAMAW LIBRARY: Thursday, February 20 at 10:00 a.m. “Litchfield Tea & Poetry Series: Al Black & Gary Jackson.” Featured poets Al Black and Gary Jackson both draw attention to matters of racial inequity and struggle through their work. An Indiana native, Black has published two poetry collections, I Only Left For Tea (2014) and Man With Two Shadows (2018); co-edited Hand in Hand, Poets Respond to Race (2017); and is published in anthologies, journals, and periodicals. He hosts arts events, co-founded Poets Respond to Race Initiative and was Jasper Magazine’s 2017 Literary Artist of the Year. Gary Jackson is the author of the poetry collection Missing You, Metropolis, which received the 2009 Cave Canem Poetry Prize. His poems have appeared in Callaloo, Tin House, Los Angeles Review of Books, and elsewhere. He teaches in the MFA program at the College of Charleston in Charleston, South Carolina.
  • GEORGETOWN LIBRARY: Georgetown Library will be the site of a riveting musical play on February 26th at 4 pm.  Bright Star Touring Theatre of Arden, North Carolina will perform their award-wining new show “Freedom Songs: The Music of Black History.” From the work songs of the fields of people who were enduring the bonds of slavery, to Ragtime, Jazz, R&B, and the inspired spirituals of the Civil Rights movement, this play follows the compelling story of the role that music played in the history of Black Americans. Meet incredible Americans like Scott Joplin, Billy Holladay, Little Richard and more in a tale that is sure to intrigue audiences of all ages!